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Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at RailsConf, contact Yvonne Romaine at yromaine@oreilly.com.

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Personal schedule for Aman Gupta

Download or subscribe to Aman Gupta's schedule.

Tutorial
Location: Ballroom II
Clinton N. Dreisbach (Relevance, Inc.)
Average rating: ***..
(3.58, 31 ratings)
Smart developers have been using Ruby on Rails to rapidly build web applications for over 5 years now. Cutting-edge projects have aged into old, moldy, legacy apps. Rails 3 and Ruby 1.9 offer performance improvements and new features that are guaranteed to take the squeak out of that old wheel and grease the tracks of new development. Read more.
General
Location: Room 347
Average rating: ***..
(3.38, 8 ratings)
Discussing common problems and design patterns to make your stylesheets “Syntactically Awesome”. Bring simple designs that needs to be converted and we will help you achieve awesomeness or if you don’t have any designs that need converting we will supply some basic templates that you can work with to get a handle on implementation. Presented by Chris Eppstein. Read more.
Tutorial
Location: Ballroom II
John Athayde (LivingSocial), Bruce Williams (LivingSocial)
Average rating: ***..
(3.72, 29 ratings)
The Rails View layer is the Wild West. Bad mustaches, crazy fights over simple things, and complete and utter confusion abound. When do we use a helper or a presenter? How do we keep logic and markup separate? What's this here new fangled boilerplate and HTML5/CSS3 thing? Read more.
Event
Location: Chesapeake Ballroom - 3rd Level
Average rating: ****.
(4.60, 25 ratings)
Ignite is a high-energy evening of 5-minute talks by people who have an idea - and the guts to get onstage and share it with the rest of the Rails community. Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom I
José Valim (Plataforma Tec)
Average rating: ***..
(3.82, 61 ratings)
A huge step forward in the third version of the Rails 3 framework is the modularity it provides. This modularity is the result of a long refactoring effort to make it easier to extend or modify Rails to suit our application's needs. Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom I
Bryan Liles (Smarticus)
Average rating: **...
(2.16, 76 ratings)
We all use ActiveSupport 3 every day. Many of us don't take the time to dig down into some of the more interesting parts. This talk will explore the history of ActiveSupport and demonstrate areas most aren't familiar with. Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom IV
Paul Campbell (Hyper Tiny)
Average rating: ***..
(3.50, 4 ratings)
This is a talk about what being a Rails developer means to me, why I'm proud to be one and why you should be too. Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom II
Avdi Grimm (ShipRise LLC)
Average rating: ****.
(4.02, 62 ratings)
Are your methods timid? Do they constantly second-guess themselves, checking for nil values, errors, and unexpected input? Learn how to write code in a straightforward, confident style that is more testable, easier to read, and easier to debug. Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom III
John Nunemaker (OrderedList, Inc.)
Average rating: ***..
(3.76, 33 ratings)
Having built two object mappers in Ruby (MongoMapper and ToyStore), I would like to throw out a crazy thought. What if, on your next project, you ditch the ORM. No ActiveRecord. No DataMapper. No anything. Just you and a lower level driver, whispering sweet nothings into Ruby classes and modules. Could you? Would you? DARE you? Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom I
Zach Holman (GitHub)
Average rating: ***..
(3.06, 16 ratings)
Selling a product once is fun, but selling that product twice is wildly excellent. GitHub does that with Firewall Install, our installable enterprise GitHub. This talk aims to discuss how you can repackage your existing product too, by covering code strategies for parallel codebases, supporting remote server infrastructures, and talking about the impressively stupid decisions we've made. Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom I
Michael Cerna (Groupon)
Average rating: *....
(1.65, 26 ratings)
An inside look at the tools, techniques, and scaling issues that Groupon has experienced during it's meteoric rise to becoming the fastest growing company in history! Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom II
Chris Eppstein (Caring.com)
Average rating: ***..
(3.90, 39 ratings)
Let's face it. CSS is dumb. There is no such thing as a DRY CSS file and stylesheets are often the biggest blemish in an otherwise beautifully coded app. Sass is the future of stylesheets. Rails 3.1 includes it by default and the W3C is adding concepts from Sass to CSS itself. Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom II
Aman Gupta (GitHub)
Average rating: ****.
(4.57, 53 ratings)
Ruby might be slow, but bad code only makes it worse. This talk will teach you how to use powerful tools to see how your code is executed, so you can understand, debug and optimize it. Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom III
David Troy (410Labs)
Average rating: ***..
(3.95, 19 ratings)
Rails is a great framework for building web-based systems, but many of us don't have much experience outside of port 80 or 443. Dave Troy developed a scalable server architecture for Shortmail.com, implementing stateful, secure services such as LMTP, SMTP and IMAP using EventMachine and Rails. Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom IV
Joe Ferris (thoughtbot, inc)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 14 ratings)
Dive into the internals of thoughtbot's copycopter_client and discover how to handle difficult-to-test components such as HTTP, SSL, threads, forks, logging, caching, Rails engines, and others. Learn viable testing strategies for applications and libraries that contain such components with a focus on Rails libraries. Read more.
General
Location: Ballroom I
Yehuda Katz (Tilde Inc)
Average rating: ****.
(4.36, 56 ratings)
We all know that Rails is great for building traditional web applications that serve dynamic HTML pages. But more and more, people are reaching to other tools, like Node.js, when they build web applications with a lot of logic in the client. People often use the argument that when you remove the view helpers, there isn't much of value left in Rails. Read more.