News and Coverage

Schedule: Health sessions

Medical technology is something that almost everyone comes to rely on, whether it’s hopeful, preventive care in the form of Reseveratol, or a new limb. In no other area does the industrialized world have more of an advantage. What legal framework for personal genomics balances innovation and appropriate medical caution? How is medicine changing? How is healthcare changing across the world? Many resources are focused on anti-aging technology and drugs—is this the right direction?

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Location: Empire Room
Gavin Starks (Open Data Institute)
Average rating: ***..
(3.43, 7 ratings)
As we progress to a post-scarcity society, either you'll measure your consumption or someone else will. More data is becoming accessible than has ever existed. Whether driven by climate change, peak oil, or economic change, sustainability is now a fundamental factor of your business and your life. We'll unpack and map the dramatic changes coming to industry, markets, politics--and you. Read more.
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Location: Crystal Room
Reshma Shetty (Ginkgo BioWorks), Barry Canton (Ginkgo BioWorks)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 4 ratings)
Come learn about synthetic biology and watch a fun hands-on demo where we build a genetically engineered organism! It's like Spore, only real. No experience necessary. Read more.
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Location: Crystal Room
Chris Patil (Buck Institute for Age Research)
Average rating: ***..
(3.75, 4 ratings)
Chronological age is the primary risk factor for lethal conditions such as cancer, yet we spend the vast majority of our resources on a disease-by-disease basis, "treating the symptoms" without addressing the underlying cause. Patil will describe and defend our efforts to understand the biological basis of aging, as well as efforts currently underway to intervene in the aging process. Read more.
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Location: Imperial Ballroom
Drew Endy (Stanford & The BioBricks Foundation (BBF)), Jason Schultz (Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic, UC Berkeley School of Law), Jennifer Lynch (UC Berkeley School of Law)
Average rating: ***..
(3.33, 3 ratings)
Three leaders in the technology and law of synthetic biology will present a crisp and accessible briefing on new cooperative efforts to make tens of thousands of open source standardized DNA parts. Discussion to follow. Read more.
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Location: Empire Room
David Calkins (Robotics Society of America, et. al.)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 5 ratings)
What coming in robots? More than just the butler bot, we can expect to see many robots in all aspects of our life - home, work, hospitals, schools.... Single task robots will permeate our lives, as will telepresence bots giving us the ability to truly bi-locate. Noone can predict the future, but we can get a sneak peak. Read more.
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Location: Gold Room
John Wilbanks (Kauffman Foundation for Entrepreneurship)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
Research generates huge data sets. New formats in the semantic web bring great promise to convert portions of the scientific canon into machine-readable formats, at the same time that new collaborative lightweight methodologies allow us to represent scientific arguments and knowledge formation in real time. The Science Commons hopes to provide the infrastructure to make this happen. Read more.
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Location: Crystal Room
Eric Rasmussen (InSTEDD), Eduardo Jezierski (InSTEDD)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Diseases are spreading faster. To detect them we need to enable faster and accurate communication that can create life-saving responses. How do you do this without Western infrastructure in the jungles of South East Asia? InSTEDD has been building SMS and mapping applications while figuring out multilingual issues, ad-hoc team creation, and data integration of disconnected systems. Read more.
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Location: Crystal Room
Eric Paulos (Carnegie Mellon University)
Average rating: ***..
(3.75, 4 ratings)
From communication tool to “networked mobile personal measurement instrument.” Mobile phones as “personal measurement instruments” enable an entirely novel and empowering genre of computing usage called citizen science. Through the use of sensors paired with personal mobile phones, citizens are invited to participate in collecting and sharing measurements of their environment that matter most. Read more.
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Location: Imperial Ballroom
Gary Wolf (Wired)
Average rating: ***..
(3.20, 5 ratings)
This talk will trace the history of personal data collection from its surprising roots in the 18th century into its future as a form of self-knowledge. We will see some of the great self-tracking projects of the past and present. No products will be reviewed! This is a talk about the why of self-tracking, with illustrations from real experiments. Read more.
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Location: Crystal Room
Liz Henry (BlogHer)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Wheelchairs aren't any more complicated than bicycles, but they cost a ridiculous amount of money. They shouldn't. Neither should other simple accessibility and mobility equipment. You can't stand up all day at your desk, but you don't need a doctor to prescribe you a $6000 office chair. Open source gadget designs will help create a truly healthy industry and a culture of free invention. Read more.
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Location: Empire Room
Mike McKay (Baobab Health Malawi)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Malawi has a population of 14 million. One million have HIV and there are just 280 doctors in the country. Baobab Health deploys touchscreen computers to clinics that guide nurses through the complex process of HIV treatment. The combination of hacked hardware and open source software is challenging conventional ideas about what is possible in a place without doctors or electricity. Read more.
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Location: Crystal Room
Shelley Batts (University of Michigan)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Can deafness be cured? Novel techniques such as gene therapy, cell replacement and regeneration, artifical cell creation, and emerging types of cochlear implants will be highlighted. Read more.
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